Botswana Travel Destinations & Suggested Accommodation


Botswana is a landlocked country located north of South Africa and bordering Namibia in the west, Zimbabwe in the East and Zambia in the North.  Botswana has one of the healthiest economies in Africa, relying primarily on diamond mining and tourism.  The country is sparsely populated and due to the dryness of the country most of the population does live in or near the capital, Gaborone which leaves Botswana’s wilderness areas the exclusive domain of the avid safari enthusiast. 

Botswana is without a doubt most well-known as home to some of Africa’s largest wilderness areas including the Okavango Delta, Chobe National Park, Moremi National Park, the arid sands of the Central Kalahari Game Reserve as well as the Makgadikgadi and Nxai Pans National Parks - Botswana’s vast and diverse wilderness areas require time and effort to enjoy and will deliver the Africa of your dreams and desires.  

To maximize your safari experience to its fullest means experiencing all of Botswana’s diversity from the desert to the salt pans to the wetlands and to the savannah so it is best to combine areas of interest, including both land and water based options …

DesireAfrica Travel have put together a selection of packages which will ensure you experience all of Botswana in all its amazing splendor.  See our suggested dream itineraries or let us tailor make your personal Botswana desire .... enquire now!

Chobe National Park


Chobe National Park is located in the Northern part of Botswana and comprises an area of approximately 11 000 km² which makes it the second largest park in Botswana and it borders Zambia and Namibia making it ideal logistically to combine in a multiple destination itinerary.  The Chobe river front or the Serondela area is the most visited area of the park but there are three other separate eco systems within the Chobe National Park which include the Savuti marsh in the west as well as the Linyanti Swamps and the Linyanti Wildlife Reserve.  Without a doubt Chobe National Park is MOST famous for its massive herds of elephant with the Chobe River supporting the largest concentration of African Elephant found anywhere in Africa - it is not uncommon to encounter massive herds along the Chobe river front and combined with its superb general game-viewing all year round it is a ‘must see’.  Tiger fishing is very popular here and since the Chobe and Zambezi Rivers are known as ‘the’ premier Tiger fishing rivers in Africa this activity for the game fishing enthusiast is a ‘must do’.

Chobe National Park

Savute


Savute is situated in the western corner of the Chobe National Park and south of the Chobe River, wild and remote.   The open savanna grassland has a desert feel to it contrasting dramatically with the lush vegetation of the Chobe river front.  The Savute supports the highest concentration of the King of Beasts, the mighty Lion - this is the battleground of the ongoing struggle for survival between the Lion and the spotted Hyena and home to the famous ‘Savute Pride’ known for their elephant hunting skills.  When visiting the Savute one may very well feel a sense of dejavu as the area has been the scene of many a documentary including the National Geographic documentary film “Eternal Enemies” filmed by Deryck and Beverly Joubert and many others.  Game viewing is spectacular and dramatic and encounters with large numbers of elephant bulls are commonplace and in the wet season, large herds of zebra and tsessebe feed on the Savute plains.  During the summer rains, the pans of Savute fill with water, which sustains wildlife long into the dry season with Zebra and wildebeest congregating and it is not uncommon to catch sight of leopard, cheetah and African wild dog.  The area is known for its artificial waterholes which offer spectacular game viewing from the comfort of your lodge viewing deck or room.

Savute

Moremi Game Reserve


The Moremi Game Reserve is situated in the eastern portion of the Okavango Delta and it combines permanent waterways with drier areas creating contrasting diversity and wildlife facilitating an interesting combination of general savanna game viewing with leisurely cruises along the lagoons and channels.   It is arguably one of Africa’s most scenic reserves with its contrasting mopane woodlands and watery floodplains. Dense riverine forests offer the perfect hideaway for the shy leopard and the lagoons are inhabited by hippo with the Red lechwe and Sitatunga wading through the shallows.   With almost 500 species of birds from water feeders to forest dwellers, this is paradise for the avid bird watcher.  This is also home to the endangered African Wild dog and they are often seen crisscrossing the reserve - the area contains a significant percentage of Africa’s total population of wild dog.

Moremi Game Reserve

The Okavango Delta


The Okavango Delta is certainly on most peoples ‘bucket list’ and as the world’s largest inland delta so it should be - with its surreal oasis of islands and waterways flowing in the middle of the arid Kalahari Desert it is truly a miracle of nature and coupled with its remote location, diversity of game and birdlife, it is unparalleled.   The Okavango Delta is most well-known for its game viewing by mokoro (dug-out canoe);  and so as you gently float through the pristine channels and myriad waterways you are transported into a magical world with breathtaking scenery, game viewing up close and amazing birdlife.  Of course no river is still and as a meandering river, the channel in the panhandle is undergoing constant change forming oxbow lakes as well as the splitting of the channel at several points along its length and creating permanent swamps characterized by a number of larges lakes of which most are ancient oxbow lakes.  The lower regions of the delta are seasonally flooded and these are known as ‘seasonal swamps’.   There are three main channel systems which are separated by strips of permanently dry land.  These strips of dry land are separated by the Thaoge and Jao-Boro systems and Chiefs Island, another game rich strip of dry land separates the Jao and Boro systems. 

The Okavango Delta

The Makgadikgadi Pans National Park


The Makgadikgadi National Park is a harsh and dry environment created in the mid 1980’s when the flood waters of the Okavango Delta started to decline as the region entered a cycle of low rainfall in the catchment area and the Boteti River, receiving less water, began to dry back progressively and drying up completely by the mid 1990’s.  The drought left only a few waterholes in the riverbed which are fed by underground seeps.  The zebra and wildebeest herds still continue to use the rich grass plains, migrating to the river at the end of the winter to gain access to the water in the seeps.  After the start of the rainy season, this desert area teems with wildlife as herds of zebra and wildebeest graze on the wide open green grassland plains of Makgadikgadi.  The area is great for birding and in the wet season there is an influx of migratory bird species while resident desert species welcome their visitors.

The Makgadikgadi Pans National Park



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